Career Engineering Broadcast And Sound Engineering Technicians And Radio Operators Radio Operator

 
 
 
 
keyword job search 687,741 jobs Search by State or Nationwide enter name of city or metro area
 
     

 
Click Here to search jobs outside USA.
 

 

 Radio Operator Jobs

Careers in Radio Operator

Hot Job Finds! (165) Jobs Found > Radio Operator

View Jobs

[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]  Next >>

(5000) Related Jobs Found > Radio Operator

[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]  Next >>

Still can't find what you're looking for? search here:



 


Radio Operator


Significant Points

  • Job applicants will face keen competition for jobs in major metropolitan areas, where pay generally is higher; prospects are expected to be better in small cities and towns.
  • Technical school, community college, or college training in broadcast technology, electronics, or computer networking provides the best preparation.
  • About 30 percent work in broadcasting, mainly for radio and television stations, and 17 percent work in the motion picture, video, and sound recording industries.
  • Evening, weekend, and holiday work is common.

Nature of the Work

Broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators set up, operate, and maintain a wide variety of electrical and electronic equipment involved in almost any radio or television broadcast, concert, play, musical recording, television show, or movie. With such a range of work, there are many specialized occupations within the field.

Audio and video equipment technicians set up and operate audio and video equipment, including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, recording equipment, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences. They also may set up and operate associated spotlights and other custom lighting systems.

Broadcast technicians set up, operate, and maintain equipment that regulates the signal strength, clarity, and range of sounds and colors of radio or television broadcasts. These technicians also operate control panels to select the source of the material. Technicians may switch from one camera or studio to another, from film to live programming, or from network to local programming.

Sound engineering technicians operate machines and equipment to record, synchronize, mix, or reproduce music, voices, or sound effects in recording studios, sporting arenas, theater productions, or movie and video productions.

Radio operators mainly receive and transmit communications using a variety of tools. These workers also repair equipment, using such devices as electronic testing equipment, handtools, and power tools. One of their major duties is to help to maintain communication systems in good condition.

The transition to digital recording, editing, and broadcasting has greatly changed the work of broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators. Software on desktop computers has replaced specialized electronic equipment in many recording and editing functions. Most radio and television stations have replaced videotapes and audiotapes with computer hard drives and other computer data storage systems. Computer networks linked to specialized equipment dominate modern broadcasting. This transition has forced technicians to learn computer networking and software skills.

Broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators perform a variety of duties in small stations. In large stations and at the networks, technicians are more specialized, although job assignments may change from day to day. The terms “operator,” “engineer,” and “technician” often are used interchangeably to describe these jobs. Workers in these positions may monitor and log outgoing signals and operate transmitters; set up, adjust, service, and repair electronic broadcasting equipment; and regulate fidelity, brightness, contrast, volume, and sound quality of television broadcasts.

Technicians also work in program production. Recording engineers operate and maintain video and sound recording equipment. They may operate equipment designed to produce special effects, such as the illusions of a bolt of lightning or a police siren. Sound mixers or re-recording mixers produce soundtracks for movies or television programs. After filming or recording is complete, these workers may use a process called “dubbing” to insert sounds. Field technicians set up and operate portable transmission equipment outside the studio. Because television news coverage requires so much electronic equipment and the technology is changing so rapidly, many stations assign technicians exclusively to news.

Chief engineers, transmission engineers, and broadcast field supervisors oversee other technicians and maintain broadcasting equipment.


Working Conditions

Broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators generally work indoors in pleasant surroundings. However, those who broadcast news and other programs from locations outside the studio may work outdoors in all types of weather. Technicians doing maintenance may climb poles or antenna towers, while those setting up equipment do heavy lifting.

Technicians at large stations and the networks usually work a 40-hour week under great pressure to meet broadcast deadlines, and may occasionally work overtime. Technicians at small stations routinely work more than 40 hours a week. Evening, weekend, and holiday work is usual because most stations are on the air 18 to 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Even though a technician may not be on duty when the station is broadcasting, some technicians may be on call during nonwork hours; these workers must handle any problems that occur when they are on call.

Technicians who work on motion pictures may be on a tight schedule and may work long hours to meet contractual deadlines.


Employment

Broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators held about 95,000 jobs in 2004. Their employment was distributed among the following detailed occupations:

Audio and video equipment technicians46,000
Broadcast technicians34,000
Sound engineering technicians13,000
Radio operators2,000


About 30 percent worked in broadcasting (except Internet) and 17 percent worked in the motion picture, video, and sound recording industries. About 7 percent were self-employed. Television stations employ, on average, many more technicians than radio stations. Some technicians are employed in other industries, producing employee communications, sales, and training programs. Technician jobs in television and radio are located in virtually all cities; jobs in radio also are found in many small towns. The highest paying and most specialized jobs are concentrated in New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Washington, DC—the originating centers for most network or news programs. Motion picture production jobs are concentrated in Los Angeles and New York City.


Training

The best way to prepare for a broadcast and sound engineering technician job is to obtain technical school, community college, or college training in broadcast technology, electronics, or computer networking. In the motion picture industry, people are hired as apprentice editorial assistants and work their way up to more skilled jobs. Employers in the motion picture industry usually hire experienced freelance technicians on a picture-by-picture basis. Reputation and determination are important in getting jobs.

When starting out, broadcast and sound engineering technicians learn skills on the job from experienced technicians and supervisors. These beginners often start their careers in small stations and, once experienced, move on to larger ones. Large stations usually hire only technicians with experience. Experienced technicians can become supervisory technicians or chief engineers. A college degree in engineering is needed in order to become chief engineer at a large television station. Many employers pay tuition and expenses for courses or seminars to help technicians keep abreast of developments in the field.

Audio and video equipment technicians generally need a high school diploma. Many recent entrants have a community college degree or other forms of postsecondary degrees, although they are not always required. These technicians may substitute on-the-job training for formal education requirements. Working in a studio as an assistant is a great way of gaining experience and knowledge.

Radio operators usually are not required to complete any formal training. This is an entry-level position that generally requires on-the-job training.

Licensing is not required for broadcast technicians. However, certification by the Society of Broadcast Engineers is a mark of competence and experience. The certificate is issued to experienced technicians who pass an examination.

Prospective technicians should take high school courses in math, physics, and electronics. Building electronic equipment from hobby kits and operating a “ham,” or amateur, radio are good experience, as is working in college radio and television stations.

Broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators must have manual dexterity and an aptitude for working with electrical, electronic, and mechanical systems and equipment.


Other Qualifications

Advancement

Job Outlook

People seeking entry-level jobs as technicians in broadcasting are expected to face keen competition in major metropolitan areas, where pay generally is higher and the number of qualified jobseekers typically exceeds the number of openings. Prospects for entry-level positions are expected to be better in small cities and towns for beginners with appropriate training.

Overall employment of broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators is expected to grow about as fast as average for all occupations through the year 2014. Job growth in radio and television broadcasting will be limited by consolidation of ownership of radio and television stations and by labor-saving technical advances, such as computer-controlled programming and remotely controlled transmitters. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is required to examine its media ownership rules quadrennially. Thus, the rules can change periodically. In 2005, FCC regulations stated that a single owner could own up to eight radio stations in a single large market and that a single owner could not own television stations that would reach more than 39 percent of households. Revisions to these rules have been passed by the FCC, but have not been implemented because of legal challenges. When broader common ownership is allowed, stations often are consolidated and operated from a single location, reducing employment because one or a few technicians can provide support to multiple stations. Technicians who know how to install transmitters will be in demand as television stations install digital transmitters. Although most television stations are broadcasting in both analog and digital formats and plan to switch entirely to digital, radio stations are only beginning to broadcast digital signals.

Employment of broadcast and sound engineering technicians in the cable and pay television portion of the broadcasting industry is expected to grow as the range of products and services expands, including cable Internet access and video-on-demand. Employment of these workers in the motion picture industry is expected to grow rapidly. However, job prospects are expected to remain competitive because of the large number of people who are attracted by the glamour of working in motion pictures.

Projected job growth varies among detailed occupations in this field. Employment of audio and video equipment technicians and sound engineering technicians is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations. Not only will these workers have to set up audio and video equipment, but they will have to maintain and repair it as well. Employment of broadcast technicians is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations through 2014, as advancements in technology enhance the capabilities of technicians to produce higher quality radio and television programming. Employment of radio operators, on the other hand, is projected to decline as more stations control programming and operate transmitters remotely.

In addition to employment growth, job openings also will result from the need to replace experienced technicians who leave this field. Some of these workers leave for other jobs that require knowledge of electronics, such as computer repairer or industrial machinery repairer.


Earnings

Television stations usually pay higher salaries than radio stations; commercial broadcasting usually pays more than public broadcasting; and stations in large markets pay more than those in small markets.

Median annual earnings of audio and video equipment technicians in May 2004 were $32,570. The middle 50 percent earned between $24,180 and $44,290. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $19,110, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $58,620. Median annual earnings in motion picture and video industries, which employed the largest number of audio and video equipment technicians, were $33,670.

Median annual earnings of broadcast technicians in May 2004 were $28,010. The middle 50 percent earned between $19,240 and $42,760. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $14,960, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $62,850. Median annual earnings in radio and television broadcasting, which employed the largest number of broadcast technicians, were $25,220.

Median annual earnings of sound engineering technicians in May 2004 were $38,110. The middle 50 percent earned between $25,470 and $56,320. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $19,180, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $80,450.

Median annual earnings of radio operators in May 2004 were $32,720. The middle 50 percent earned between $23,960 and $43,850. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $17,960, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $57,420.


Related Occupations

Broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators need the electronics training necessary to operate technical equipment, and they generally complete specialized postsecondary programs. Occupations with similar characteristics include engineering technicians, science technicians, and electrical and electronics installers and repairers. Broadcast and sound engineering technicians also may operate computer networks, as do computer support specialists and systems administrators. Broadcast technicians on some live radio and television programs screen incoming calls; these workers have responsibilities similar to those of communications equipment operators.


Sources of Additional Information

For career information and links to employment resources, contact:

National Association of Broadcasters, 1771 N St. NW., Washington, DC 20036. Internet: http://www.nab.org


For information on certification, contact:

Society of Broadcast Engineers, 9247 North Meridian St., Suite 305, Indianapolis, IN 46260. Internet: http://www.sbe.org


For more information on audio and video equipment technicians, contact:

InfoComm International, 11242 Waples Mill Rd., Suite 200, Fairfax, VA, 22030. Internet: http://www.infocomm.org


Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition, Broadcast and Sound Engineering Technicians and Radio Operators, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos109.htm (visited July 19, 2006).



State Career Channel


    Featured Jobs

    Browse Featured Jobs

    Employers post a job here

    Hot Jobs

    Browse Hot Jobs



    Featured Employers

    3E Bed Bath & Beyond BI-LO Brooks Running
    buybuy BABY C & S Companies Cabela's Incorporated Carestream
    Central Community College Christmas Tree Shops City of Hope Community Health Center, Inc.
    Compass Group Datto Foley Equipment Fresco Y Mas
    Harmon Harveys Ifbyphone, Inc. Information Services Group
    Integra LifeSciences InterContinental Hotels Group Interim HealthCare Keenan & Associates
    KPMG LMI Aerospace NeighborWorks America Nestle Purina
    O'Reilly Auto Parts Office Depot Packaging Corporation of America Phillips 66
    Schaedler Yesco Shimadzu Scientific Instruments, Inc. Southeastern Grocers Sun National Bank
    The Children's Village The Hanover Insurance Group The Nature Conservancy The Scotts Miracle-Gro Company
    Thorlabs tronc TSymmetry Union of Concerned Scientists
    US Ecology, Inc. Vermeer Midwest Winn Dixie

    Partners

    IHire Job Target One Click Recruitology



    Diversityworking Ads


    Post Your Resume Now

    This website has been awarded the "preferred website" status
    in the Who's Who Guide


    Trade Pub